Amahn's

sometimes you have to break yourself down to build your true self

feels free to adk questions :-)

dynastylnoire:

MAKE THIS A THING

(Source: thegeminipix, via thai-red-curry)

scienceyoucanlove:


Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

through 
Neurons want food

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

through 

Neurons want food

iloveyouthough:

khakhov:

frenchmontanicure:

Rebloggable by request

oh my god, every single one of these!

I couldn’t not reblog this. Wow…

(via rashiddarden)

mtvnews:

the little rascals, 20 years later

sonnyjaycorleone:

went ahead and fucked up .

sonnyjaycorleone:

went ahead and fucked up .

(via thai-red-curry)

I was really bored at work but my bottle tried to cheer me up

I was really bored at work but my bottle tried to cheer me up

kawaii-levi-rivaille:

the-8ae-reloaded:

cumgirl1:

s1uts:

whateveryourfantasyis:

bootyscientist:

500daysofbased:

niggafuckurblog:

ibadbitch:

thatdudeemu:

tarynel:

Bruh..

Naw it ain’t never been this serious

Oh shit.. I thought that was a burn scar

🙊

disgusted

NO

nah..

…..

can she live?


gagging

//:

The fuckery

kawaii-levi-rivaille:

the-8ae-reloaded:

cumgirl1:

s1uts:

whateveryourfantasyis:

bootyscientist:

500daysofbased:

niggafuckurblog:

ibadbitch:

thatdudeemu:

tarynel:

Bruh..

Naw it ain’t never been this serious

Oh shit.. I thought that was a burn scar

🙊

disgusted

NO

nah..

…..

can she live?

gagging

//:

The fuckery

(via brokebitchantics)

facts-i-just-made-up:

bullshifter:

Take my Kids.Show them the head.Sorry… no Christmas this year.

Show them the whole museum! Kids love martyrdom! They have:
A pinky bone of St. Slarley of Siberia
An arrow that pierced St. Sebastian
The once-missing nose ring of St. Corriander
The iPod of St. Jones of Michigan
St. Patrick’s pet snake
Both nipples of St. Jourgensen the Evangelist
The bong of St. Marley
St. Hildebrandt’s silent T
St. Valentine’s heart
St. Sinatra (All of him, they just took all of him)
The 14 toed cat of St. Hemmingway of Kiliminjaro
Eva Marie Saint’s hair
The jet ski of St. Martinez de Acapulco
The toenails of St. Reggie Von Hedgicide
And most famously-
The chalice that held the blood of St. Gilmore of Orleans that spilled on August 9th, 1432 when he ascended the steps of Numernunk and got a bloody nose upon the 193rd step and then tripped and fell down to the 177th step and cursed the name of our lord and got struck by lightning as a result, praise be upon him.

facts-i-just-made-up:

bullshifter:

Take my Kids.
Show them the head.
Sorry… no Christmas this year.

Show them the whole museum! Kids love martyrdom! They have:

  • A pinky bone of St. Slarley of Siberia
  • An arrow that pierced St. Sebastian
  • The once-missing nose ring of St. Corriander
  • The iPod of St. Jones of Michigan
  • St. Patrick’s pet snake
  • Both nipples of St. Jourgensen the Evangelist
  • The bong of St. Marley
  • St. Hildebrandt’s silent T
  • St. Valentine’s heart
  • St. Sinatra (All of him, they just took all of him)
  • The 14 toed cat of St. Hemmingway of Kiliminjaro
  • Eva Marie Saint’s hair
  • The jet ski of St. Martinez de Acapulco
  • The toenails of St. Reggie Von Hedgicide

And most famously-

  • The chalice that held the blood of St. Gilmore of Orleans that spilled on August 9th, 1432 when he ascended the steps of Numernunk and got a bloody nose upon the 193rd step and then tripped and fell down to the 177th step and cursed the name of our lord and got struck by lightning as a result, praise be upon him.